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    23 Dec 2016

    Qing Nuptial Dinner
reanimated by Chinese Culinary Institute and Hong Kong Heritage Museum
    Qing Nuptial Dinner
reanimated by Chinese Culinary Institute and Hong Kong Heritage Museum
    Qing Nuptial Dinner
reanimated by Chinese Culinary Institute and Hong Kong Heritage Museum
    Qing Nuptial Dinner
reanimated by Chinese Culinary Institute and Hong Kong Heritage Museum

    Qing Nuptial Dinner reanimated by Chinese Culinary Institute and Hong Kong Heritage Museum

    The series of 4 dishes Smoked Shredded Chicken with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Long” (Dragon), Shredded Pork Shank in Two Ways with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Feng” (Phoenix), Shredded Five-Spice Duck with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Cheng” (Presenting), Shredded Duck in Two Ways with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Xiang” (Peace) illustrates the special plating skill of using Chinese characters to decorate the dishes Palace.
    The series of 4 dishes Smoked Shredded Chicken with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Long” (Dragon), Shredded Pork Shank in Two Ways with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Feng” (Phoenix), Shredded Five-Spice Duck with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Cheng” (Presenting), Shredded Duck in Two Ways with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Xiang” (Peace) illustrates the special plating skill of using Chinese characters to decorate the dishes Palace.
    4 out of 14 dishes in the Nuptial menu used duck as main ingredient as duck was a popular ingredient for royal Qing. This Double-Boiled Duck Soup with Bird’s Nest also uses Bird’s Nest and features auspicious decorative character, which are commonly seen in the imperial menu during Qing Dynasty.
    4 out of 14 dishes in the Nuptial menu used duck as main ingredient as duck was a popular ingredient for royal Qing. This Double-Boiled Duck Soup with Bird’s Nest also uses Bird’s Nest and features auspicious decorative character, which are commonly seen in the imperial menu during Qing Dynasty.
    That the skin of the lamb should be crispy but not hard, and the meat soft but not mushy are standards required of a good Roasted Lamb.
    That the skin of the lamb should be crispy but not hard, and the meat soft but not mushy are standards required of a good Roasted Lamb.
    Being asked if the dumplings are cooked, the bride should answer “raw” (Sheng, pronounces the same as giving birth in Chinese”) in order to express the auspicious meaning that the bride will give birth to a son soon.
    Being asked if the dumplings are cooked, the bride should answer “raw” (Sheng, pronounces the same as giving birth in Chinese”) in order to express the auspicious meaning that the bride will give birth to a son soon.
    (23 December, 2016) The Chinese Culinary Institute (CCI) was invited by Hong Kong Heritage Museum to participate in the exhibition “Ceremony and Celebration – The Grand Weddings of the Qing Emperors” to study and reanimate 9 dishes in the Nuptial dinner menu. At the exhibition, members of the public can view the royal dishes and short videos showcasing how the dishes were prepared.

    Visitors can learn more about Qing culinary culture through the Nuptial dinner which carries auspicious meanings. The series of 4 dishes Smoked Shredded Chicken with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Long” (Dragon), Shredded Pork Shank in Two Ways with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Feng” (Phoenix), Shredded Five-Spice Duck with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Cheng” (Presenting), Shredded Duck in Two Ways with Bird’s Nest and the Character “Xiang” (Peace) illustrates the special plating skill of using Chinese characters to decorate the dishes which was fairly popular in the Qing Palace. The nutritious Double-Boiled Duck Soup with Bird’s Nest and Ginseng, cooked together with lotus seeds, red dates and matsutake and decorated with a “double happiness” character, features Royal Qing’s popular ingredients duck and bird’s nest. For Roasted Lamb and Roasted Pork, two famous main courses in a Qing banquet, the skins should be crispy but not hard, the meat soft but not mushy. Poached Dumplings with Assorted Nuts and Dried Fruits are half-cooked dumplings filled with red dates, peanuts, longans and chestnuts, which symbolise “giving birth to a son soon”.

    Mr Pierre LAU, Programme Manager (Chinese Catering & Operation) of CCI, explained that since there has not been much record of the nuptial dinner hence the CCI team had to do extensive research and seek help from experts. Apart from having invited Mr WAN Tat-kong, an expert in Chinese culinary culture to join the team, CHAN Kai-hon, CCI Chief Instructor (Chinese Food Preparation) and the team also visited Ms YUAN Hongqi, an expert in Qing royal history and Kairui Yu Xian Du Chinese Royal Gastronomy Museum in Beijing to learn more about royal dishes. Based on the directions provided by the experts, the chef instructors and students of CCI have finally succeeded in reanimating the dishes balancing history and aesthetics after many attempts.

    The “Ceremony and Celebration – The Grand Weddings of the Qing Emperors exhibition" displays exhibits selected from rare and unique collections of The Palace Museum, including documents, portraits, costume, personal ornaments, dowry objects, wedding ritual objects and court musical instruments, among others, will serve to explain the processes of imperial weddings. The exhibition is on display at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum now until 27 February 2017.

    Chinese Culinary Institute (CCI)
    The Chinese Culinary Institute (CCI, formerly known as the Chinese Cuisine Training Institute) is a member of VTC Group. CCI was established in 2000 to provide systemic training courses from elementary to master chef levels and endeavour to create a systematic training system in Chinese Cuisine; elevate the professional status of Chinese Chefs as well as the quality and hygiene standard of Chinese Cuisine in Hong Kong; and establish Hong Kong as a regional training and accreditation centre in Chinese Cuisine by introducing trade testing to the industry.

    Website: www.cci.edu.hk

    Media Enquiry: 2538 2229 / 2538 2792



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